Pacman Frogs As Pets
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Pacman Frogs As Pets

Pacman frogs make unique, fun and interesting pets. Pacman frogs are one of the largest frogs available as pets and are also one of the most aggressive types of pet frogs. Pacman frogs are best suited for experienced amphibian owners as they tend to be very ornery and may bite is irritated.

Pacman frogs are native to South America, and most commonly reside in Brazil and in the Amazon basin. Pacman frogs are one of the largest types of frogs in the world and are popular with amphibian enthusiasts in both Europe and North America. Pacman frogs are one of the most pugnacious of frogs that are sold as pets, and can become aggressive and bite if they are irritated or feel threatened. Even with daily socialization and care, Pacman frogs will never become truly friendly and will retain their ornery temperament. They are best kept solo, as they will fight, often to the death, with others of their own kind. Pacman frogs tend to be noisy, and often croak and ribbit during both the day and evening, especially during breeding season.

Pacman frogs are carnivores that eat a variety of insects, small mammals, other amphibians and reptiles. In captivity, Pacman frogs are usually fed bird’s eggs, pinkie mice, crickets and small fish. However, Pacman frogs will attempt to eat anything that they can fit in their mouths and will eat small rodents, baby frogs, small snakes and lizards and even small birds. Pacman frogs are very tenacious eaters and will bite their owner’s fingers if they get in the way at food time. They are also notorious for attempting to swallow too large of animal and choking to death on it, so owners need to be careful with the size of prey they feed them.

As adults Pacman frogs measure 7-9 inches; females are generally larger than males are. Pacman frogs are normally bright yellow with dark green markings on their stomach and back. They have small horns above their eyes that are dark red or a yellow-orange colour. In captivity, Pacman frogs have an average lifespan of 6-10 years; female Pacman frogs live longer than male Pacman frogs do.

Pacman frogs should be kept in a secure aquarium that is a minimum of 25 feet large; only one Pacman frog should be kept per aquarium. Pacman frogs naturally live in tropical jungles so their aquarium should be set up similar. Pacman frogs require both a dry land and a water area; however, their water area does not have to be deep or extremely large. Pacman frogs are not good swimmers so their water area should only be 3-5 inches deep; a large swallow water dish works well. Chlorine-free water should always be used with any frog as they absorb water through their skin and chlorine can kill them. The aquarium should be covered with a couple of inches of aquarium gravel with about five inches of peat soil or moss on top. The Pacman’s aquarium should include things like flat stone, longs and branches, plants and a reptile hide. The temperature in the aquarium should be between 77-82 Fahrenheit, and the aquarium should be misted daily with chorine-free water to help maintain proper humidity levels.

Pacman frogs are best suited for experienced amphibian owners and are not safe pets for young children, as they will bite if irritated. They are not cuddly pets, nor pets that can be taught tricks or played with. However, they are very unique and interesting pets, that can bring owners hours of enjoyment watching them.

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Comments (2)

Very interesting Patricia, thank you.

Ranked #21 in Pets

Pacman frogs, just the name makes me smile! :)

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